Burnout

AEM Early Access 28: A cross-sectional analysis of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction in pediatric emergency medicine physicians in the US

Welcome to the twenty-eighth episode of AEM Early Access, a FOAMed podcast collaboration between the Academic Emergency Medicine Journal and Brown Emergency Medicine. Each month, we'll give you digital open access to an recent AEM Article or Article in Press, with an author interview podcast and suggested supportive educational materials for EM learners.

Find this podcast series on iTunes here.

AEM Podcasts logo[3].png

DISCUSSING (CLICK ON TITLE FOR FULL TEXT, OPEN ACCESS THROUGH JULY 31):

A cross-sectional analysis of compassion fatigue, burnout and compassion satisfaction in pediatric emergency medicine physicians in the US. Jeanie Gribben, BS, Samuel Kase, BA, Elisha Waldman, MD, and Andrea Weintraub, MD.

LISTEN NOW: AUTHOR INTERVIEW WITH Jeanie Gribben, BS AND Andrea WeintrauB, MD

Gribben_Headshot_2019.png

Jeanie Gribben, BS

Fourth-year medical student, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Andrea Weintraub Headshot.jpg

Andrea Weintraub, MD

Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Newborn Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai


ABSTRACT:

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction and identify potential personal and professional predictors of these phenomena in pediatric critical care providers.

Design: Cross-sectional, online survey.

Setting: Pediatric critical care practices in the United States.

Subjects: Pediatric critical care fellows and attending physicians.

Interventions: None.

Measurements and Main Results: A modified Compassion Fatigue and Satisfaction Self-Test for Helpers and a questionnaire of personal and professional characteristics were distributed electronically to pediatric critical care physicians nationally. Prevalence of these phenomena was calculated. Hierarchical linear regression models for compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction as a function of potential risk factors were constructed. The survey response rate was 35.7%. The prevalence of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction was 25.7%, 23.2%, 16.8%, respectively. Burnout score, emotional depletion, and distress about a patient and/or the physical work environment were each significant determinants of higher Compassion Fatigue scores. Preparing for didactics, Compassion Fatigue score, distress about administrative issues and/or coworkers, and "self-care is not a priority" were each significant determinants of higher burnout scores, whereas female sex, Compassion Satisfaction score, and distress about the physical work environment were each significant determinants of lower burnout scores. Prayer/meditation, talking with colleagues, senior faculty level, and student and/or chaplain involvement when delivering bad news were each significant predictors of higher Compassion Satisfaction scores, whereas female sex, burnout score, emotional depletion, and distress about coworkers were each significant predictors of lower Compassion Satisfaction scores.

Conclusions: In our population, chronic exposure to distress in patients and families puts pediatric critical care physicians at risk for compassion fatigue and low compassion satisfaction. Awareness of compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction and their predictors may benefit providers both personally and professionally by allowing them to proactively manage their distress.